Search
Mobile Site Shops eMail Author Caption Comp Monthly Poll Sudden Death Colour Key Statistics Cookie Usage
Ships Fleets Weaponry Species People Timelines Calculators Photo Galleries
Stations Design Lineage Size Charts Battles Science / Tech Temporal Styling Maps / Politics
Articles Reviews Lists Recreation Search Site Guide What's New Forum
Ship
Related
Constitution
Class Starships
Klingon
Battlecruiser
Klingon
Bird of Prey
Magazine
Capacity
NX Class
Phase Cannon
Sovereign
Changes
Star Trek
: Discovery
The
Defiant
The USS
Franklin
Culture /
Philosophy
Borg
History

Money

Monoculture
Religion
in Trek
Technology
Levels
The Ba'Ku
Land Grab
Trills
/ Dax
General
Technology
Abrams
Speed!

Antimatter

Phasers
Romulan
Warp Drive
The
Holodeck
Torpedo
Yields
Transwarp
Theories
Tri-cobalt
device
Warp in a
Solar System
Warp Speed
Anomalies
Energy
And Power
D'Deridex Class
Weapon Power
Galaxy Class
Shield Strength
Galaxy Class
Total Output
Galaxy Class
Weapon Output
Genesis
Weapon Power
Husnock Warship
Weapon Power
Intrepid Class
Total Output
TOS Type 2 Phaser
Weapon Power
Trilithium Torpedoes
Weapon Power

Miscellaneous
Dangling
Threads
Enterprise
Ramblings
Eugenics
War Dates
Here be
Remans?
Live fast...
Write Badly

Maps

Materials
Nemesis
Script
Random
Musings
Scaling
Issues
Size of the
Federation

Stardates
The Ceti Alpha
Conundrum
The Size of
Starfleet
Trek XI
Issues
ReviewImagesDatapointsQuotes
TimelinePreviousNextYour View

The Best of Both Worlds, Part 2

Review

Series : The Next Generation Rating : 4
Disc No : 4.1 Episode : 74
First Aired : 24 Sep 1990 Stardate : 43999.1
Director : Cliff Bole Year : 2367
Writers : Michael Piller Season : 4
Guest Cast :
Carl David Burks as Russell
Colm Meaney as Miles Edward O'Brien
Elizabeth Dennehy as Lieutenant Commander Shelby
George Murdock as Admiral J.P. Hanson
Guy Vardaman as Darien Wallace
Todd Merrill as Lieutenant Gleason
Moral :
Rememberence : They shall not grow old, as we who are left shall grow old. At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, we shall remember them.
YATI : Beverly claims that the Borg cannot cut off their link to Locutus, comparing it to a Human cutting off an arm or a leg. Ignoring for a moment the fact that some Humans have done just this in an emergency, the Borg tried to destroy the shuttle carrying Locutus away from their cube in the first place. So it looks like they had no problem cutting the link after all. Also, both the Borg and the Enterprise drop out of warp whilst still many light hours from Earth and do a leisurely impulse cruise to the planet. Wouldn't this have been a good time for the Federation ship to warp right into orbit, like they did in "The Schizoid Man"?
Great Moment : The graveyard scene at Wolf 359.
Body Count : Later episodes establish that 11,000 Starfleet personnel are killed offscreen at Wolf 359. At least several tens of thousands of Borg drones were likely to have been killed when the cube was destroyed. Worf kills some of them on screen during the rescue/capture of Locutus.
Factoid : This is the first episode to show that shuttles have their own transporter systems. It also features the now legendary battle of Wolf 359; although we have only ever seen small clips of this engagement, it remaines probably the most influential battle in Star Trek history.

This episode is a nominee for the DITL "Best of Trek" award.


Plotline

All attempts to stop the Borg fail thanks to the now assimilated Picard, and it smashes a Federation fleet before heading towards Earth. Riker orders a daring raid to recapture his former captain from the cube, but the Borg nevertheless proceed onward. With the home world of the Human race on the brink of destruction, the Enterprise crew make one last desparate attempt to stop their apparently invincible foes.
Copyright Graham Kennedy Page views : 9,157 Last updated : 27 Jun 2004