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Sons and Daughters

Guest Reviews

Title : Sons and Daughters Rating : 2
First Aired : 13 Oct 1997 Stardate : Unknown
Director : Jesus Salvador Trevino Year : 2374
Writers : Bradley Thompson, David Weddle Season : 6
Rating : 4.0000 for 1 reviewsAdd your own review
Reviewer : James Koon Rating : 4
Review : ***Spoiler Alert*** I give this such a "high" rating because of the special place in my heart for Worf and his son. First, I feel that from the certain point that it acknowledges Worf having a son and gives the boy direction. The "and daughters" part of the title deals with Ziyal, and to be honest, it is the subplot, though fairly informative to the mindset of Nerys and the overall plot of most of Season Six, and the plot that backs her with the mindset that "The Dominion occupation isn't so bad", though as far as freedom is concerned, and occupation isn't good (sorry for the run-on, but plot synopsizes tend to do that in the hands of the inebriated). The plot lines on DS9 definitely invoke that mindset, sometimes too well that it feels rather melancholy and like we're watching prison, at least from the characters respective. However, the soul of this episode is Worf and Alexander. And in my honest opinion, Alexander was underly utilized, not only in TNG, but in DS9 as well. However, this episode at least embodies the spirit of the Klingon, and develops Worf in the sense that he can be a good father if provided with a favorable chance (even by a son that might as well be the ship jester), especially with what happens to him and Jadzia in later episodes. By and by, passable if you're jumping episodes, but it at least in the end, grows Worf, and even the relationship between Martok and the former, and a such can't be subjugated to negative reviews in the grand scope of Worf the character, let alone DS9 as a whole. You can't touch the house of Martok. ^.^
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Copyright Graham Kennedy Page views : 4,557 Last updated : 1 Jan 1970