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All Books

Title : Dragon's Honor
Writers : Greg Cox, Kij Johnson
Year : 1996
Rating : 1.5000 for 2 reviewsAdd your own review
Reviewer : SEU7tCJfsXV Rating : 1
Review : I agree. Recently I realized if I work anhoetr 20 years as an engineer (I know guys in their 70s still doing engineering), my traditional 401k and traditional IRA could be at $1,000,000. I have to start taking distributions by 70 and a half. Also I have currently $200,000 in a Roth IRA. So if I take $100,000 per year from my traditional part, my taxes could be in the 28% bracket at the federal level. On the other hand stock investments outside deferral plans will get at most a 20% long term capital gain taxes (Bush tax cuts expire in 2013). I changed my habit to just invest enough in a 401k to get company match. The amount I would have otherwise contributed (including the after-50 catchup) is going into cash for now. I need to pay the other half of the taxes on my conversion to Roth IRAs next April. After that, I decided to mostly invest in good quality companies with very low or no dividends. Dividends will be taxed at ordinary rates starting in 2013. I could be a non-resident of California owning real estate there, and a resident of Nevada. Anytime I want to cash out capital gains, I will return to my Nevada residence for that period of time and officially exit California. That way I would avoid the California capital gains tax. That's my plan in the future.Cash is certainly king. And yes I have zero debt. I have well over $25,000 in T-bills and I think interest rates will certainly come back up. I'm building up T-bills slowly and building up cash in my passbook savings rapidly. I will go up to 2 year notes in a couple of years, after I build up $100,000 in T-bills and passbook savings. I have 52-week T-bills only. But they are evenly spread out so that I have T-bills maturing every 4 weeks and I roll them back in.I think $50,000 or $60,000 will be decent in red states or inland California. But coastal is my aim. I love the California climate the most and on the coast.
Reviewer : pvdyZDHq Rating : 2
Review : Rating I bought this set after doing a liltte research on their (Footprint Tools) website. When they arrived (in Amazon's typically inadequate packaging), the first thing I noticed were the words Made in China. Needless to say, I sent them right back and ordered a couple of Stanley [#'s 4&5 contractor grade] bench planes as well as a Lie Nielson block plane. It's true that you get what you pay for. I'm also one more American who is tired of seeing the words Made in China on everything. As a Tool & Diemaker, and someone who is intimately familiar with quality worksmanship, I'd highly recommend Stanley Bailey and [if you can afford them] Lie Nielson Planes.
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Copyright Graham Kennedy Page views : 2,258 Last updated : 1 Jan 1970